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A Designer's Guide to Instrumentation Amplifiers, 2nd by Charles Kitchin, Lew Counts

By Charles Kitchin, Lew Counts

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Extra info for A Designer's Guide to Instrumentation Amplifiers, 2nd Edition

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In contrast, a standard dual-supply in-amp can only swing to within a volt or two of either supply or ground. When operated from a 5 V single supply, these in-amps have only a volt or two of output voltage swing, while a true rail-to-rail amplifier can provide a peak-to-peak output nearly as great as the supply voltage. Another important point is that a single-supply, or rail-to-rail in-amp, will still operate well (or even better) from a dual supply, and it will often operate at lower power than a conventional dual-supply device.

AD622 CMR vs. Frequency ((RTI) 0 to 1 k Source Imbalance) ���� �� ��� �� �� �� Single-supply in-amps have special design problems that need to be addressed. The input stage must be able to amplify signals that are at ground potential (or very close to ground), and the output stage needs to be able to swing to within a few millivolts of ground or the supply rail. Low power supply current is also important. And, when operating from low power supply voltages, the in-amp needs to have an adequate gain bandwidth product, low offset voltage drift, and good CMR vs.

AD622 Closed-Loop Gain vs. Frequency �� Monolithic In-Amps Optimized for Single-Supply Operation �� �� � ��� �� � �� ��� �� ��������� ���� ��� ���� �� Figure 3-18. AD622 CMR vs. Frequency ((RTI) 0 to 1 k Source Imbalance) ���� �� ��� �� �� �� Single-supply in-amps have special design problems that need to be addressed. The input stage must be able to amplify signals that are at ground potential (or very close to ground), and the output stage needs to be able to swing to within a few millivolts of ground or the supply rail.

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